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Inspired by the introduction of females into Olympic swimming he designed a close-fitting costume with shorts for the bottom and short sleeves for the top.

During the 1920s and 1930s, people began to shift from "taking in the water" to "taking in the sun", at bathhouses and spas, and swimsuit designs shifted from functional considerations to incorporate more decorative features.

He named the swimsuit after Bikini Atoll, where testing on the nuclear bomb was taking place.

Fashion designer Jacques Heim, also from Paris, re-released a similar design earlier that same year, the Atome.

By making an analogy with words like bilingual and bilateral containing the Latin prefix "bi-" (meaning "two" in Latin), the word bikini was first back-derived as consisting of two parts, [bi kini] by Rudi Gernreich, who introduced the monokini in 1964.

The Language Report, compiled by lexicographer Susie Dent and published by the Oxford University Press (OUP) in 2003, considers lexicographic inventions like bandeaukini and camkini, two variants of the tankini, important to observe.

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With the development of new clothing materials, particularly latex and nylon, swimsuits gradually began hugging the body through the 1930s, with shoulder straps that could be lowered for tanning.

Teen magazines of late 1940s and 1950s featured similar designs of midriff-baring suits and tops.

However, midriff fashion was stated as only for beaches and informal events and considered indecent to be worn in public.

Wartime production during World War II required vast amounts of cotton, silk, nylon, wool, leather, and rubber.

In 1942, the United States War Production Board issued Regulation L-85, cutting the use of natural fibers in clothing Although briefer than the two-piece swimsuits of the 1930s, the bottom of Heim's new two-piece beach costume still covered the wearer's navel.